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For Living Life To Its Fullest- The Morning Routine

For Living Life To Its Fullest- The Morning Routine

 

ESTABLISHING MORNING ROUTINES FOR CHILDREN TIPS

Establishing Morning Routines post

 

THE MORNING ROUTINE is sometimes the most dreaded part of the day. Parents have to get themselves and the kids up, dressed, fed, prepared for the day, and out the door in a timely fashion. How can you stay on schedule while supporting your children and helping them become more independent?

The following tips are from pediatric occupational therapy practitioners who have experience in establishing healthy and efficient morning routines.

If you want to: 

Help children get up on time.

Consider these activity tips:
•Identify a wake up time for children starting at around 1 year, and be consistent. Allowing children to get up at different times every day makes it difficult for them to know what to expect.
•After about 4 years of age, children who are early risers can be told that it is okay to get out of bed, but they must play quietly in their room until an established time or until you enter their room.

•For families with multiple children, staggering wake up times can help ensure an efficient morning routine by helping one child at a time, beginning with the youngest child first.

•Sleep patterns can be influenced by temperature, lighting, natural rhythms, and diet. An occupational therapy practitioner can help review the family routines and environment and make recommendations as needed.

If you want to:

Promote positive mood and behavior.

Consider these activity tips:

•Even if parents are not morning people, a positive morning attitude can help make children happier during the morning routine. Greetings of “good morning” and “have a wonderful day” help set the tone and prepare a child to socialize well in school.

•Affection is also an important way to start the day, so begin with some cuddle time or a hug. This can be a quick way to start the morning routine with care.

•Consider how your child’s sensory experiences may impact mood or behavior. During breakfast, is the kitchen crowded with people or objects? Are new foods being prepared, accompanied by new smells? Watch your child for signs of enjoyment or distress.

If you want to:

Establish organized and timely morning routines.

Consider these activity tips:

•Plan ahead. Things like choosing clothes, determining breakfast, and putting homework in backpacks should be done the night before.

•Remove unnecessary clutter, and review calendars and weather projections to avoid the unexpected.

•Including children in decisions about clothing and food is important, and doing it the night before can avoid long discussions in the morning. Also, be sure to limit younger children to two choices (e.g., “you may wear the polka dot or striped outfit”) so the decision is quicker and easier.

If you want to:

Prepare children for morning time demands.

Consider these activity tips:

•Talk to your children the night before about what will happen each morning. Ask them to name the steps of the morning routine.

•Reviewing the morning routine helps to reinforce it. In the morning as they complete a task, ask them what is next.

If you want to:

Keep on task.

Consider these activity tips:

•Creating a visual checklist can help a child participate in the morning routine. Spend a weekend afternoon creating a checklist with your child so he or she gets excited about using it. Ask for suggestions on what to include and ask him or her to draw pictures for each step. As the child ages, you may update the checklist to avoid boredom.

•Help avoid distractions by leaving the television off in the morning.

If you want to:

Promote participation and independence.

Consider these activity tips:

•It may be faster and easier to dress children or do their hair, but it is important for them to practice and learn to engage in the morning routine independently.

•Allow children to dress independently on weekends and then progress to weekdays as they become more skilled. Start with a certain aspect of dressing, like putting on socks, then add more complicated clothing, like shirts with buttons. It is okay to let them go to school with a unique outfit or hairdo!

If you want to:

Promote flexibility as well as structure.

Consider these activity tips:

•Despite the importance of structure and routine, there are some days, like weekends and holidays, where the routine can be relaxed.

•Plan pajama days or fun breakfast times on weekends and holidays to let your children know that sometimes the routine can be changed.

•Remember, fun and play are important ways to promote a child’s healthy development.

If you want to:

Make morning routines fun.

Consider these activity tips:

•If routines are fun, children will be more engaged. Think about being creative with dressing and grooming activities. Play upbeat music while children are getting dressed. If they get dressed early, allow them to play with a special toy. Reward them for a job well done.

Download a PDF version of this article here.

Need More Information?
Pediatric occupational therapy practitioners promote participation of all children and their families in everyday activities or occupations, including morning routines. When there is a particular area of concern, the occupational therapy practitioner can create an individualized strategy based on the specific needs of the child and family.
Occupational therapy practitioners work with children in their homes, at school, in private practice, at children’s hospitals, and in other community locations, providing interventions that are individualized, appropriate, and effective. Ask your pediatrician or school administrator for a recommendation, or look online to find an occupational therapist in your area.
You can find additional information through the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) at www.aota.org.
AOTA thanks Joy Doll, OTD, OTR/L, for her assistance with this Tip Sheet.

Occupational therapy is a skilled health, rehabilitation, and educational service that helps people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations).
Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association. This material may be copied and distributed for personal or educational uses without written consent. For all other uses, contact copyright@aota.org.

Special Education Trends

special education boy

Special Education Trends

With the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), many aspects of rights were looked into.  The primary focus of this article will look at inclusion and the placement of students with disabilities, the discipline and manifestation review process, and the right to an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).  With rights for disabilities comes laws and regulations that ensure that each student is receiving a free and appropriate education as laid out by IDEA.

Inclusion involves deciding whether or not a student should be included in the general education classroom or whether or not he/she should be in a different setting, to include a resource room, a one-on-one area, or in a different school.  Unfortunately, many schools don’t want to have to deal with students who have violent or aggressive behaviors or disabilities that could cause a distraction to the rest of the classroom.  Fortunately, those students are covered under national and state standards.

“It has been estimated that 54% of students with disabilities are receiving their instruction in the regular classroom 80% or more of the day” (Grant, 2015, para. 1).

The first case that addressed inclusion was Pennsylvania Association of Retarded Children (PARC) v. Pennsylvania in 1972, which started the movement with several other cases leading to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (Blankenship, Boon, & Fore, 2007).

One of the hardest parts of inclusion is ensuring that the student with a disability is able to participate and socialize in an inclusive environment while allowing other students the opportunity to learn as well.  With inclusion comes the decision of discipline and what can be done according to the law and for what is best for the student. 

Discipline can be a very tricky part of educating a student with a disability, because it needs to be looked into further before a decision can be made.  According to the webpage created by Thomas S. Nelson, a special education attorney,    in the past, “schools were twice as likely to suspend a special needs student because of behavioral problems” (“Discipline,” n.d., para. 2).     Congress finally recognized this as a problem and created the Manifestation Determination Hearing, which ensures that each student is looked at personally and determinations are made based off of the unique traits of that student.

Many factors go into determining whether or not a student should be suspended or expelled, to include a Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP), a determination by the parent and school that there should be an alternate placement, or if drugs, weapons, or serious injury occur (“Discipline,” n.d.).

special education pictureLast, an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is an important current, and hopefully permanent trend, which allows for a team to meet, to include teachers, speech therapists, parents, interventionists, and other relevant members to meet and discuss the individual needs of students.  There are several steps in the IEP process to include evaluation, curriculum, placement, and behavioral goals (Hyatt-Foley, 2011).

The IEP was initiated in 1975 and allows for modifications to curriculum, schedule, and various other factors to ensure that the student is allowed the most appropriate education possible (“IEP,” 2015).    The IEP allows team members to decide on what will benefit the child’s education and learning environment and is a legally binding document that must be followed and reported on.

Effects of the trends

How do the above listed trends affect the students, educators, and the families?  Inclusion has allowed all students, regardless of disability to be involved in the general education environment and has allowed the students the same opportunities as their peers.  Parents should feel that the child is receiving the most appropriate education possible, and educators have a clear understanding through training and law of what each student should be included in.   Unlike in the past, discipline for students with disabilities has a legal process that ensures that all factors are looked at and that the student isn’t expelled or suspended without first finding out the underlying cause of the behavior.  Last, but not least, the IEP is a guideline for how the student should be taught, based on curriculum, educational and behavioral goals,  and environment.  The IEP team is allowed to discuss the student in great detail and decide what the best course of action will be for that unique student.

References

Blankenship, T., Boon, R. T., & Fore, C. (2007). Inclusion and placement decisions for students with special needs: A historical analysis of relevant statutory and case law. Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education, 2(1), 1-10. Retrieved from http://corescholar.libraries.wright.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1074&context=ejie

Defending expulsions: The general and special education setting. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.specialedlaw.us/education/discipline.php

Grant, M. (2015). Current trends in special education. Retrieved from http://study.com/academy/lesson/current-trends-in-special-education.html

Hyatt-Foley, D. (2011). IEP basics: What the school forgot to tell you. Retrieved from http://www.tsbvi.edu/seehear/winter02/iep.htm

Special education manual 2015. (2015). Retrieved from https://www.sde.idaho.gov/site/special_edu/manual_page.htm

The history of the IEP. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.specialednews.com/the-history-of-the-iep.htm

Benefits of Sign Language

Communicating with your pre-verbal child………Benefits of Sign Language.

American Sign Language (ASL) is a beneficial support for your child’s speech, language, and overall development. ASL has been proven not only to impact natural development, speech, and language, but also improve I.Q and enhance interactions with your child’s environment. By utilizing sign language with your child, research has shown closer parent to baby bonds and more feelings of “being in tune” with each other. Additionally, sign language allows for fewer moments of distress for your child due to the ability to participate in pre/non-verbal communication, increased excitement and opportunities to communicate, increased attention and overall learning skills, as well as enhanced creativity and curiosity about the environment. ASL can serve as a bridge for the child that is bilingual and may be learning a new language. In regards to speech and language development, ASL can provide for a smooth transition from gestures to speaking, improved vocabulary and confidence, enhanced use of adjectives and adverbs, empowered earlier reading and recognition of sight words, and increased overall expressive and receptive language skills. Overall, sign language can help your child to decrease frustrations and better enhance his/her abilities to perform in all environments.

American Sign Language (ASL) is a beneficial support for your child’s speech, language, and overall development. ASL has been proven not only to impact natural development, speech, and language, but also improve I.Q and enhance interactions with your child’s environment.  The attached flyer provides valuable information about sign language misconceptions, benefits and more!  Happy signing!

SignLanguageArticle_Page_2

Want More Information?

babysignlanguage.com

signingtime.com

babysigningtime.com

Mother’s Day at Children’s Therapy Place

Mother’s Day at Children’s Therapy Place

Run for Autism

Run for AutismCome join us in the Run for Autism April 25th 9 am – 11 am at Veterans Memorial Park 930 Veterans Memorial Parkway, Boise, ID 83703

RUN FOR AUTISM

April 25 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Educate, Advocate, Support!

Join the Autism Society Treasure Valley for our 13th annual Run For Autism. Create a team, bring your family & friends, or just come along for a lovely riverside run or walk in support of autistic individuals.

8:00am Registration opens
9:00am Kids Course
9:15am 5K Run/Walk (timed)
9:30am 2.5 mile Family Stroll
10:15am Raffle prize winners announced
http://www.asatvc.org/event/run-for-autism/

Autism Awareness Day

Autism Awareness DayNNU will hold its third annual Autism Awareness Day on Saturday, April 18 from 9 a.m.–4 p.m. on campus. The day will include a variety of opportunities for autism education, participation in support activities and family fun.

In the morning, an autism awareness conference titled “What can we learn?” is open to educators, church groups and individuals.

Autistic individuals and their families are invited to attend a luncheon on the Brandt Center lawn prior to the NNU men’s baseball game where they will be recognized before the start of the game at 1 p.m.

Register for Autism Awareness Day here.

More info can be found at:

http://wesleycenter.nnu.edu/events/autism-awareness-day

Does your child have anxiety?

Anxiety in Children and Teens | Children's Therapy PlaceAnxiety can be overlooked in children. Does any of this sound like your child or teen?

  • Difficulty separating, excessive clinginess, crying, and/or tantrums
  • Excessive shyness, quiet, avoiding social situations
  • Pessimism and negative thinking patterns such as imagining the worst, over-exaggerating the negatives
  • Constant worry about things that might happen or have happened
  • Avoidance behaviors, including things, situations or places because of fears
  • Physical complaints of frequent stomachaches or headaches
  • Experiencing sudden and frequent panic attacks

Anxiety is the most common mental health concern for children and adults. Because anxious children and teens are often quiet and compliant, however, they frequently go unnoticed by their parents and teachers. As a result, many never receive the help they desperately need.

Anxiety can be managed!

Anxiety in Children and Teens | Children's Therapy Place

Here are some tips to help your child.

Become a detective and begin recording your child’s moods and behaviors.
When are they at their best….or worst? What happened right before a behavioral meltdown? Was there too much commotion or noise? Often times, children can become overstimulated and need a quiet place to calm.

Let your child know they can talk to you and be available to your child.
Encourage your child to talk to you about any problems he may be having, and to talk about his feelings openly and honestly. Be present for your child as much as possible.

Be sure to listen to your child before offering suggestions.
As much as you might want to jump in and help offer solutions, allow your child time to fully express their thoughts and emotions before making comments or expressing your opinions.

Try doing something active with your child.
Some children may feel more comfortable talking about their problems while engaging in an activity with a parent. Do something you both enjoy, such as going for a walk, making cookies, or playing a round of basketball in the driveway before asking your child to discuss a problem he may be having. Exercise is wonderful for anxiety, it’s a natural anti-depressant/stress reliever increasing our “happy chemicals” in our brain.

Get your child to do some deep breathing activities.
Deep breathing helps to calm the body. With calm slow breaths the rest of our body will follow. Our blood pressure slows down, our heart rate slows down and eventually our entire body will begin to relax. Encourage your child to breathe in “good” air and exhale “bad” air, and picture it carrying any worries out of his/her body. With young children blowing bubbles is an excellent way to help them grasp the idea of deep breathing.

Get your child into counseling.
If your child continues to have behaviors that may exhibit anxiety call and schedule an appointment with a counselor at Children’s Therapy Place for your child. Anxiety is a horrible feeling and your child deserves to get the help he/she needs to resolve this.

Thank Social Workers!

thank social workers In recognition of the invaluable services provided by our social workers, Children’s Therapy Place is celebrating National Professional Social Work Month this March. The staff at CTP would like to express how very grateful we are for the work that our social workers do to help enhance the lives of children and families in Boise and Meridian.

Thank Social Workers!

The month of March has been proclaimed by the Idaho legislature as Social Work Recognition Month. This year’s theme is “Social Work Paves the Way for Change” and it was selected to convey what the social work profession has done to bring about positive changes in society and for individuals.

CTP thanks the almost 4,000 licensed social workers in Idaho for their dedication to making a difference in the day-to-day lives of Idahoan’s by helping to build, support and empower positive family and community relationships.

Please join me in recognizing our CTP social workers for their tireless dedication to helping make profound differences in the lives of children and their families.

Miss Amazing – Reach for the Stars

Miss AmazingIt’s been an AMAZING year for 13 year old Ani Besteder, the reigning 2014 Idaho Miss Amazing Preteen Queen.   After winning the crown in Idaho, Ani went on to the national competition in Omaha and placed 3rd in her age group. “It feels amazing,” said Ani at the 2014 pageant. “It’s great to make new friends here and see some familiar faces.”

Miss AmazingMiss Amazing is not just a beauty contest, it’s a program that encourages participants to dream big and reach their goals. It celebrates the abilities of girls and women with disabilities and supports learning of social and communication skills throughout the process.

Children’s Therapy Place (CTP) therapist, Stephanie Schoenfeld (COTA) co-leads a weekly occupational therapy group and has witnessed Ani’s extraordinary growth in self-confidence and social skills. Miss Stephanie commented, “It has been exciting to see Ani gain independence with activities of daily living. This independence has provided her with improved social skills, including the ability to initiate conversation and improved interactions with her peers.” Ani now has a new personal goal in the area of public speaking…. she’s looking forward to working in the community with Miss Stephanie to educate children about autism.

Miss AmazingWhen asked how therapy has helped Ani, her mother, Amy commented, “Ani’s skills are always changing and improving and I think that’s just the coolest thing. Her life has been changed for the better with the support of the amazing therapists at CTP.”

Miss Amazing Pageants prove that the world is a much better place when the talents and ambitions of all people are celebrated and valued. CTP celebrates Miss Amazing 2014, Ani Besteder, and all children with disabilities who inspire us all to reach for the stars!

The 2015 Idaho Miss Amazing Pageant will be held March 27-28, 2015 in Nampa, Idaho.

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Contact Us

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Boise, ID 83704

6429 W Interchange Lane
Boise, ID 83709

5640 E. Franklin Rd, Suite 180
Nampa, ID 83687

P.O. Box 27906
Panama City, FL 32411

Phone 208.323.8888
Fax 208.323.8889

MENTAL CRISIS LINE
208-761-2310


info@childrenstherapyplace.com

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