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6 Tips to Having a Sensory Friendly 4th of July

6 Tips to Having a Sensory Friendly 4th of July

With parades, BBQs and professional grade firework displays, the 4th of July is, for many of us, an anticipated hot weather holiday.
Though the traditions that surround this day of celebration are generally fun for the whole family, they can be overwhelming and nearly intolerable for children with autism or Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD).

If your child has trouble dealing with sensory stimulation, here are some survival tips to help your whole family enjoy the day.4thbird

1. Prepare your child for the day

Whatever you’re planning for the day, make sure your child knows what to expect.  Explain that there will be a lot of people and noise, but there will also be plenty of fun activities.  If your child responds to visual cues, you can try showing him a video of fireworks (with the volume turned down at first) or a parade.  Gradually increase the volume and take note of his reaction.  Though it’s important that he knows what to expect, try not to go overboard.  Sometimes too much anticipation can be just as overwhelming.

2. Bring favorite and familiar items

Familiar toys, games and snacks can provide comfort and distraction from over-stimulating sights, sounds and smells. These favorites can also come in handy if he gets antsy while waiting for an activity, like a parade or firework show, to start.

3. Establish a safe place

Whether it’s bringing along a small tent or a blanket to hide underneath or finding a spot that allows relief from noise and people, make sure to establish a “safe place” for him when he feels like he needs a break. If it’s easier to retreat to a location, agree upon a “safe word” or visual cue that he can use to let you know that he’s feeling overwhelmed.

4. Engage in heavy work activities

Heavy work is characterized by activities that involve the whole body or parts of the body to increase attention and calm the senses.  Actions like pushing, pulling, lifting, chewing and squeezing are all meant to engage the body and, in a sense, organize the nervous system.

Have your child help you prepare for the day by packing a picnic basket or loading the car with lawn chairs.  Have fidget toys and oral motor stimulators (like straws, teethers or licorice) available during the day so he can keep his hands and mouth busy and focus his attention.

5. Bring along sunglasses and noise blocking headphones

If watching a firework show or just hanging out in a neighborhood where residents will be setting off fireworks, noise blocking headphones may be helpful to quiet any loud or unwanted sound.  Bright lights from fireworks also have the potential to stir up sensory discomfort, so having sunglasses on hand or a hat can help to ease visual overstimulation.

6. Stay mindful of the situation

Most importantly, keep an eye on how your child is handling the day.  Even if you have prepared yourself and him for every possible scenario, he may still have a difficult time engaging in activities.  Pay attention to his cues and if it’s too much for him, it may be best to remove him from the situation and go home.

Whether your child is able to engage in a full day of activities, or just visit a BBQ and spend a quiet evening at home playing board games, the 4th of July is a great day of celebration with family and friends.  The most important thing is to find a holiday tradition that allows your family to enjoy the day together.

 

Sources:
“Tips for an Autism-Friendly Fourth of July.” Autism Speaks: It’s Time to Listen. Autism Speaks, Inc., 2 July 2013. Web. 20 June 2014.http://www.autismspeaks.org/blog/2013/07/02/tips-autism-friendly-fourth-july.

“Sensory-Friendly July 4th.” Dandelion. Family Publishing, Inc., 28 June 2012. Web. 20 June 2014. http://www.godandelion.com/blog/item/92-fourthofjuly.

Taken from: http://www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2014/07/02/6-tips-to-having-a-sensory-friendly-4th-of-july/

20 Summertime Speech & Language Activities for Toddlers

Here is a list of 20 fun summertime speech and language activities to do with your toddlers.

  1. Blow bubbles– helps build vocabulary (examples: “pop” “, “blow” etc.) and strengthens muscles of the mouth
  2. Play Outside– improves fine and gross motor, social skills and language skills
  3. Read a book– builds speech and language skills
  4. Go on a scavenger hunt– builds language skills and works on following directions
  5. Eat a popsicle– strengthen the mouth muscles for speech with this summer treat
  6. Go swimming– improves gross motor skills and vocabulary
  7. Play with a friend around the same age– develops social skills and language
  8. Draw with sidewalk chalk– works on fine motor and colors
  9. Make mud pies– this is a fun sensory activity
  10. Have a picnic– builds vocabulary and how to follow directions
  11. Take a walk outside– can improve vocabulary and describing skills
  12. Plant a flower– this is a sensory activity and helps with following directions
  13. Make some cookies– targets following directions and vocabulary
  14. Finger paint– helps with learning colors and basic concepts
  15. Build a sandcastle– sensory activity
  16. Make lemonade– works on ability to follow directions and wakes up the mouth for speech
  17. Free play– this is just fun  and increases speech and language skills
  18. Play at a park– Target vocabulary and sound repetition while playing
  19. Attend story time at your local library– builds speech and social skills
  20. Visit the zoo– targets animal sounds and vocabulary

For more information contact Children’s Therapy Place

FREE speech screenings

For the entire month of May Children’s Therapy Place will be doing FREE Speech Screenings. Are you worried about your child’s speech/language development? Take a look at this articulation chart we have provided to compare to your child’s speech sounds. If you have any concerns please do not delay to schedule a speech screening!

Call our office at 208-323-8888.

FREE speech screenings

Or use our contact form

Autism Society Treasure Valley 15th annual Run For Autism

Event Info

15th Annual * April 30, 2016 * Veterans Memorial Park, Boise, Idaho * Educate, Advocate, Support!

Join the Autism Society Treasure Valley for our 15th annual Run For Autism. Create a team, bring your family & friends, or just come along for a lovely riverside run or walk in support of autistic individuals.

REGISTER ONLINE BEFORE APRIL 1st TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF EARLY-BIRD PRICING!Autism

8:00am Registration opens
9:00am Kids Course
9:15am 5K Run
9:30am 2.5 mile Family Stroll
10:30am Raffle prize winners announced

“Early-Bird” Pricing (4 and under is free)

  • Adult: $22
  • Child (ages 5-12): $15
  • Autistic individual: $7
  • Team/Group (4 or more people): $18

T-shirt sizes

Youth small, med, or large
Adult small, med, large, or x-large **2-4XL sizes cost $2 extra

Autism Society Treasure Valley is a 501-C (3) nonprofit volunteer-operated organization.

* Discount for teams of 4 and above. The discount rate of $18 applies to team members who would normally pay $22. Rates for children and autistic individuals remain the same.

* If you want to register as part of a team, simply type in the team name. This lets us know who is walking/running together.

* 1 raffle ticket is included with your registration. You may buy extra tickets at $5 per ticket.

Follow our Facebook page and subscribe to events:  Autism Society Treasure Valley

Follow us on twitter @ASATVC

REGISTER HERE

Children’s Therapy Place T-Shirt Design Contest

You can be as creative as you want! Here are some guidelines:

1) Make sure that your design includes the words “Children’s Therapy Place”
2) We are looking for an original design that embodies Children’s Therapy Place.
3) Deadline is Nov. 21st.
Email designs (or questions) to lcaroselli@childrenstherapyplace.com or stop by any of our offices to drop them off today! If hand drawn designs please draw them on 8 1/2 inch by 11 inch paper.
We can’t wait to see what you come up with!
Thanks!

T-shirt Design Contest

Benefits of Sign Language

Communicating with your pre-verbal child………Benefits of Sign Language.

American Sign Language (ASL) is a beneficial support for your child’s speech, language, and overall development. ASL has been proven not only to impact natural development, speech, and language, but also improve I.Q and enhance interactions with your child’s environment. By utilizing sign language with your child, research has shown closer parent to baby bonds and more feelings of “being in tune” with each other. Additionally, sign language allows for fewer moments of distress for your child due to the ability to participate in pre/non-verbal communication, increased excitement and opportunities to communicate, increased attention and overall learning skills, as well as enhanced creativity and curiosity about the environment. ASL can serve as a bridge for the child that is bilingual and may be learning a new language. In regards to speech and language development, ASL can provide for a smooth transition from gestures to speaking, improved vocabulary and confidence, enhanced use of adjectives and adverbs, empowered earlier reading and recognition of sight words, and increased overall expressive and receptive language skills. Overall, sign language can help your child to decrease frustrations and better enhance his/her abilities to perform in all environments.

American Sign Language (ASL) is a beneficial support for your child’s speech, language, and overall development. ASL has been proven not only to impact natural development, speech, and language, but also improve I.Q and enhance interactions with your child’s environment.  The attached flyer provides valuable information about sign language misconceptions, benefits and more!  Happy signing!

SignLanguageArticle_Page_2

Want More Information?

babysignlanguage.com

signingtime.com

babysigningtime.com

Mother’s Day at Children’s Therapy Place

Mother’s Day at Children’s Therapy Place

Run for Autism

Run for AutismCome join us in the Run for Autism April 25th 9 am – 11 am at Veterans Memorial Park 930 Veterans Memorial Parkway, Boise, ID 83703

RUN FOR AUTISM

April 25 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Educate, Advocate, Support!

Join the Autism Society Treasure Valley for our 13th annual Run For Autism. Create a team, bring your family & friends, or just come along for a lovely riverside run or walk in support of autistic individuals.

8:00am Registration opens
9:00am Kids Course
9:15am 5K Run/Walk (timed)
9:30am 2.5 mile Family Stroll
10:15am Raffle prize winners announced
http://www.asatvc.org/event/run-for-autism/

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6855 W. Fairview Ave.
Boise, ID 83704

6429 W Interchange Lane
Boise, ID 83709

5640 E. Franklin Rd, Suite 180
Nampa, ID 83687

2273 E. Gala Street, Suite 120 
Meridian Idaho 83642

P.O. Box 27906
Panama City, FL 32411

Phone 208.323.8888
Fax 208.323.8889

MENTAL CRISIS LINE
208-761-2310


info@childrenstherapyplace.com

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Offices in Boise, Nampa, Emmett, Statewide Online and Now serving the Florida Panhandle

 

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